Charles Dickens. Great Expectations (in English, chapter 5)

Комната мисс ХавиншемПродолжаем читать и слушать аудиокнигу на английском языке по одному из самых интереснейших произведений викторианской эпохи, который написал величайший классик английской литературы Чарльз Диккенс Большие надежды ( Большие ожидания). Текст книги адаптирован до уровня СРЕДНИЙ (Intermediate). Глава 5 «Драка и поцелуй».

Читайте и слушайте  Chapter Four «Miss Havisham»

Charles Dickens. Great Expectations. Chapter Five «A Fight and a Kiss»

  • treated me as if I were — обращалась со мной как будто бы я был
  • behave yourself — веди себя хорошо
  • I was quite willing to work — я не прочь поработать
  • I made out — я понял

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I went to Miss Havisham’s often after that; and always Estella treated me as if I were no more than a dog in disgrace; and always, for some reason, I longed to win her favour.

Then there came a day, when, as she and I were on our way upstairs, we met a gentleman coming down.

“What have we here?” asked the gentleman, stopping and looking down at me.

“A boy,” replied Estella.

He was a big man, with an exceedingly large head that was bald on the top. He took my chin in his hand and turned up my face to have a look at me in the candlelight. His eyes were set very deep in his head, and were sharp and suspicious, and he had thick black eyebrows that wouldn’t lie down.

“Boy of the neighbourhood, eh?” he said. “How do you come here?
“Miss Havisham sent for me, sir,” I answered.

“Well, behave yourself!” he said. “Do you mind me? Behave yourself!”

With these words, he went on down the stairs. There was not much time to consider what the man had been doing there, for we were soon in Miss Havisham’s room.

“Are you ready to play?” she asked me. “Or would you rather work?”
I said I was quite willing to work, and she took up a stick and came and laid her hand on my shoulder. “Take me into the room opposite,” she said.

I entered the room she had pointed out. The windows were bricked up so that the daylight could not enter, but there were candles here and there faintly lighting the room. It was a big room and in the centre was a long table with a cloth spread on it, as if a feast had been in preparation when the house and the clocks all stopped together. A great centre-piece of some kind was in the middle of this cloth, so overhung with cobwebs that I could not make out what it was, but I could see spiders running home to it, and others running out from it.

“This,” said Miss Havisham, pointing at the table with her stick, “is where I shall be laid when I am dead. What do you think that is?” Again pointing with her stick, “ that—where the cobwebs are?”

“I can’t guess what it is, ma’am.”

“It’s a great cake. A bride-cake. Mine.”

She glared all round the room, and then said, leaning upon my shoulder: “Come, come, come! Walk me, walk me!”
I made out from this that the work I had to do was to walk Miss Havisham round and round the room. Accordingly, I started at once, and away we went, round and round and round. After a while she said, “Call Estella.” When Estella came, she said: “Take Pip down to the garden, Estella. Give him something to eat and let him wander and look about him while he eats. Go, Pip.”

Charles Dickens. Great Expectations (in English) — слушатьна английском языке ПРОДОЛЖЕНИЕ главы 5 (аудио, часть 2):

  • neglected garden — заброшенный сад
  • I was so astonished — я был так удивлен
  • had a bad fall — упал и сильно ударился
  • The same to you. — И вам того же.
  • was worth nothing at all — ничего не стоило

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 Estella took me down to the yard, left me waiting, and returned with some bread and meat, which she handed to me without looking at me, and left me. I wandered round the corner of the yard, and into a neglected garden, like a wilderness. Then, never doubting that the house was empty, I stared in at a window and found myself, to my great surprise, looking into the face of a boy with light hair.

This pale young gentleman quickly disappeared, and came out of a door close by.

“Who let you in?” he asked.

“Miss Estella.”

“Who gave you leave to wander about?”

“Miss Estella.”

“Come and fight,” said the pale young gentleman.

I was so astonished that I followed him to a quiet corner of the garden. There he pulled off not only his jacket, but his shirt too, in a most businesslike and bloodthirsty manner. I judged him to be about my own age, but he was much taller, and my heart failed me when he came dancing at me with his hands up. I have never been so surprised in my life as I was when I hit out at him and saw him lying on his back, looking up at me with the blood pouring from his nose.

But he was on his feet at once and came at me again. The second greatest surprise I have ever had was seeing him on his back again, looking up at me out of a black eye.

So it went on. He seemed to have no strength, and he never once hit me hard, and he was always knocked down. He got heavily bruised, for I am sorry to say that the more I hit him the harder I hit him; but he came up again and again and again, until at last he got a bad fall with

“All right,” he said, when he had got his breath back. “You’ve won!”

“Are you all right? Can I help you?” I asked anxiously.

“No, thank you,” he replied.

“Good afternoon, then,” I said, turning away.

The same to you,” he answered as I walked off.

When I got back to the yard I found Estella waiting with the keys. She looked very pleased about something. Instead of going straight to the gate, she stepped back into the passage and pulled me in after her.

“Come here! You may kiss me if you like.”

I kissed her cheek as she turned it to me. I think I would have gone through a great deal to kiss her cheek; but I felt that the kiss was given to the stupid, common boy as a piece of money might have been, and that it was worth nothing at all.

Charles Dickens. Great Expectations (in English) — слушать книгу на английском языке ПРОДОЛЖЕНИЕ главы 5 (аудио, часть 3):

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Дальше ВМЕСТО ЧТЕНИЯ глав 6 и 7 смотрите  экранизацию романа Чарльз Диккенс Большие надежды —> Charles Dickens Great Expectations film BBC ( первая серия заканчивается на моменте, когда Пип уезжает в Лондон).

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens To Be Continued SOON

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